Romulus Crawford

June 25, 2016

Brooke, Romulus’ owner, contacted us about helping with the astronomical expenses of treating a right foreleg sarcoma (cancer) in her beloved 8-year-old Doberman. 

 

Since the day she adopted him from an agency in Missouri he had been her constant companion, and her focus was to alleviate as much of his pain as possible so that he could maintain his quality of life. As is common in these types of osteosarcomas, the only way to alleviate the pain is by amputation the affected limb, and quickly; a delay of even a few days can make a major impact on the success of the surgery.

DIP agreed to assist with the expenses, and Romulus had the surgery, which allowed Brooke to enjoy the quality time with Romulus that was her goal.

UPDATE: She wrote us recently to let us know that Romulus suffered a recurrence of the osteosarcoma and she lost him a couple of weeks ago. We are happy we could help them have an extra year of really good time together. Our condolences to Brooke.

If you can help with a donation for any of our cases, please go to our webpage at www.dobermansinapinsch.org/donate and click on the “donate” button. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Cherry Belle

May 17, 2016 

Cherry Belle has been with her family for more than 4 of her 7 years; they adopted her from a situation where her owners could no longer care for her, so we already feel like Cherry Belle’s human parents, Katie and Brent, are pretty big-hearted people. Cherry Belle, unfortunately, has developed a lot of sinus congestion and discharge. So far, her veterinarian has treated the symptoms and tried to keep her comfortable, but this routine is not providing much relief at this point.

             

DIP is helping with the treatments of flushing the sinus cavity and medication, but a more precise diagnosis – probably from a CT scan – is needed at this point to pinpoint the cause of the congestion and discharge. Cherry Belle’s veterinarian suspects that she may have a growth, possible malignant, that’s causing the problems; this will require funding a scan, which Katie and Brent are unable to do at this time. Check out Cherry Belle’s photos on Facebook. We’ll keep her page updated with progress reports. If you can help with a donation for Cherry Belle or any of our other cases, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Aoife

May 15, 2016

Aoife (pronounced ee-FA) is a very special Doberman, in that she is a working service dog. She helps her human mom, Matilda, on a daily basis, so it is important that she be able to perform her job. A great deal of specialized training goes into preparing a service dog to perform duties specifically designed to help someone maintain an independent lifestyle, so any impediment to that performance impacts the owner of the dog pretty significantly.

At almost four years old, Aoife is in her prime. She tore the cruciate ligament in her right rear leg in February of this year, and has been restricted in her activities since that time. DIP is going to help fund TPLO (Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy) surgery for Aoife to repair her torn cruciate ligament, after which she will have several weeks of rehabilitation. Once she completes that, we expect her to resume her very important duties as Matilda’s service dog. Check out Aoife’s photos on Facebook. We’ll keep her page updated with progress reports.

 

If you can help with a donation for Aoife or any of our other cases, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Shadow

 May 17, 2016

Shadow’s human parents, Oscar and Ariana, contacted us about helping with veterinary expenses related to diagnosing exactly what had caused this winsome five-year-old DoberBoy to stop eating. They were concerned because Shadow had consumed part of a toy – a common problem with many Dobermans. We encouraged them to get Shadow to the vet immediately, which they did, and Shadow’s veterinarian, Dr. Bruce Lewis, began a series of supportive treatments and diagnostic procedures.

Dr. Lewis and the team at Grand Montecito Animal Hospital put Shadow on IV fluids and did a series of barium x-rays in order to determine first, if there was actually a portion of a toy in the intestines, and second, the exact location of it. Knowing the location of a foreign object in a dog’s intestines helps a veterinarian determine the probability of the object passing; objects that don’t pass can cut off blood supply to the area of the intestines where the object is lodged, requiring surgery to remove the object and sometimes a portion of the intestines.

Shadow’s barium x-rays indicated that any foreign object he might have ingested had passed through the stomach, leaving him with a case of ulcerative gastroenteritis. Dr. Lewis felt the condition was treatable, though it would require Shadow to remain hospitalized for another four days. During this time, Shadow’s condition deteriorated and he began to show signs of liver failure; Dr. Lewis recommended exploratory surgery to identify the cause of this. Shadow’s owners, of course, wanted to know what was going on with this young Doberman, so they proceeded with the surgery.

Once he was able to see Shadow’s intestines and organs, Dr. Lewis determined that there was damage to the liver, the spleen, and the pancreas; in addition, he could find no pulse to the intestines, indicating substantial, probably irreversible, damage. Shadow’s family opted to euthanize him at that point rather than wake him from surgery to say goodbye, as there was no possibility for him to recover from this level of organ damage.

Our hearts go out to Oscar and Ariana; Shadow was a big source of joy in their lives and we know how much they are going to miss him. Our sincere appreciation to the veterinary team, especially Dr. Lewis, at Grand Montecito Animal Hospital. Without the support of the wonderful veterinarians we work with in our organization, we would not be able to assist Doberman owners the way we do.

Shadow’s hospital bill is substantial; much more than DIP can manage on its own. If you can help with a donation for Shadow or any of our other cases, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.

Sho

October 22, 2015

 

We thought this was just the cutest name – “Sho” is short for “Shonuf” – that clever southern expression for “Sure enough,” integrated into a puppy’s name. Sho’s young life has been overshadowed by falls and a lack of coordination between his rear and his front legs. He’s never been able to even jump into the car on his own; the times he fell down at home and nobody was home to help him up he had to crawl to carpeted surfaces in order to get up. He has remained a true Doberman, stoic and uncomplaining. During his life two babies have been born into the family, and he has accepted them 100%, choosing to be in the midst of their activities.

 

Throughout his life Sho’s human mom, Talisa, has suspected that something was really wrong with him beyond puppy clumsiness. She has taken him to the vet more than once only to have him pronounced fine. While this went against her intuition she did her best to believe he was, in fact, “fine.” Recently, though, it became clear Sho was suffering from something undiagnosed. Talisa took him to a neurologist who diagnosed that Sho has wobbler’s, a condition known to affect Dobermans at higher rates than other breeds. It involves compression and/or rupture of one or more discs in the neck or back, and causes symptoms from clumsiness to total paralysis.

Talisa contacted us, told us Sho’s story, and kind of stole our hearts. She’s motivated, dedicated, and in this for the duration. She loves this dog and wants to do all that she can for him; we want to help her do that. We asked around of our friends in the Doberman community and got information about gold bead implants, along with a referral to one of the top veterinarians who does the procedure. Sho’s situation right now is more hopeful than it’s been for some time; it appears that Talisa is going to be able to take Sho to this veterinarian for a hands-on evaluation in the next week or so. We are hopeful that he will be deemed a candidate for the surgery and that it will help stabilize him and give him many good years with his family.


It will be expensive; more than DIP can fund by itself. If you can help with a donation, please CLICK HERE.  You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. And check out his photos on Facebook. We’ll keep his page updated with progress reports.

We want to extend a special thank you to fellow Doberman owner, friend, and all-around good egg, Christy Waehner, whose own experience with this condition years ago led her to set up an informational site at www.syllysylvia.com. Christy lives in Talisa’s area and the moment we put out the call for help she volunteered to help Talisa locate the resources to help Sho.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Harley

June 19, 2015

Harley is a seven-year old DoberGirl with a wonderful attitude and a big, big heart. Her family loves her, of course, so they were concerned when she suddenly wouldn’t eat. It was clear that something was wrong when she began vomiting the water she tried to drink. Harley’s mom, Kimberly, rushed her to the vet where it was determined via X-rays and an exam that Harley had swallowed a corncob. And, it was stuck – obstructing her intestines. Intestinal obstruction is a very serious condition, almost always requiring surgical intervention. Harley’s case was no different; her vet knew exactly what to do and stayed late that night in order to complete the surgery as quickly as possible.



In cases of intestinal blockage, even a few hours can make a huge difference in the dog’s chances of survival after surgery. The blockage reduces or completely cuts off the blood supply to the intestines, which in turn causes that tissue to die, or necrose. Once that happens, it must be removed. This complicates the dog’s recovery tremendously because the two “clean” portions of the intestine must then be sutured together and left to heal inside the dog’s body. This requires a skilled surgeon, a motivated owner who will do all that’s required to help the dog recover, and of course a dog who is healthy enough going in to the surgery to come out fighting.

DIP was able to help Kimberly with funding for Harley’s surgery, and our preliminary report is that Harley is home and doing well. We were able to fund this case on an emergency basis, which we normally cannot do, but Harley needed that surgery immediately, and Kimberly contacted us as soon as she got word of the obstruction. We called for a DIP Board of Directors emergency vote and were able to dot the i’s and cross the t’s in short order for Harley. We hope to hear in a week or so that Harley is completely back to normal and staying away from corncobs for the rest of her life!

 

To help with Harley’s expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch,Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Harley and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Golias

June 19, 2015

Golias has lived with Nancy, his human mom, for about four years. Before that he was owned by a man who treated him badly, and Nancy managed to get him out of that situation. Golias shares his life and his yard with some other dogs, but he was apparently the one targeted by a thief who stole him from Nancy’s yard. He was able to get free somehow, it appears, by falling or jumping from a truck or van, but in the process he broke several teeth, requiring veterinary intervention, pain management, and eventual dental surgery. Poor guy wound up with several broken and abscessing teeth; he had to have eleven teeth pulled. He is home now, and Nancy says he is doing well. She also tells us that she has installed locks on her yard gates, as this incident of theft occurred prior to that.

 

There is an obvious lesson here for all of us, which is to keep gates locked and restrict access to yards where our dogs may be. In many areas of the country purebred Dobermans are a popular breed to steal to use as bait dogs for pit bull fighting rings. Whether Golias was destined for such a fate we will never know, but we are grateful he is safe and sound following his escape from the would-be thief or thieves. And, Nancy learned a lesson too: her gates are locked now. A pretty good outcome, considering what could have happened.

DIP funded the portion of Golias’ veterinary care that Nancy wasn’t able to cover by paying off the outstanding bill for Golias’ care and treatment at the vet’s office.


  

To help with Golias’ expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Golias and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Xandra

 

May 1, 2015

Xzandra was adopted by her human mom, Mary, from the pound about five years ago. She lives with Mary and several other animal pals on five acres in rural Arizona, where she helps keep the ground squirrel population under control and lets Mary know when there is any activity around the fence line of their property. Two things have suddenly happened to throw a wrench in the works for Mary and Xzandra: Mary has been forced to stop working and is waiting for a decision on her pending disability claim, and someone shot Xzandra in the shoulder with a pellet gun. She’s been to the vet, where the recommendation was made not to remove the pellet at this time for fear of complications.

   

Mary has asked DIP for assistance with the vet bills to date, along with help buying food for Xandra during this time that she is unable to work and is waiting for a decision about her eligibility for disability. We can only imagine how unnerving it must be for her to know there is someone around who shot Xzandra….and not to know who it might be.
We want to help Mary with food for Xzandra so that she can keep this Doberman that’s become so much a part of her life, and to assist with the veterinary expenses she has incurred to date. If removing the pellet becomes a necessity, we will hold open the possibility of helping Mary with that, as well.
To help with Xzandra’s expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Xzandra and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Tanga

April 15, 2015

 

This lovely young DoberPrincess got herself into a big mess by doing something that a lot of Dobermans do: eating non-food items. Anyone who’s ever had a Doberman who does this knows that sometimes it’s no big deal and the stuff, whatever it is, passes through. And then, sometimes, it doesn’t, which creates a complete obstruction in the intestines. This leads to specialized emergency surgery and often removal of some portion of the intestine, which has often been without adequate blood supply and will have become necrosed. This is what precipitates removal of that portion of intestine.

You’ve probably guessed that this is exactly what happened to Tanga, at the tender age of only two years. She suffered a complete obstruction and had multiple perforations in her intestines; her bloodwork showed she was becoming septic, another common result of this condition. She’s had a harrowing time since her surgery the middle of last month, with multiple trips back to the hospital and a readmission for complications following surgery.

She is home now, gaining strength each day and getting back to her sunshiney self; this girl has a long way to go, though, and is not out of danger yet. We are pulling for her and hoping for a positive outcome all the way around; this has been a monumental financial hit for Tanga’s family. Her mom, Sandy, came to us for some assistance with the astronomical bills, and we would like to provide that assistance for them.

If you would like to help with Tanga’s expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Tanga and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

Tyson

March 21, 2015

We received a plea from Angela, Tyson’s human mom, to help her obtain a diagnosis for this young Doberman. She was worried about him because his abdomen seemed distended, and she told us he seemed to be getting worse by the day. It was clear to us that she cared deeply for Tyson, but as a full-time student she was completely unable to access financial resources to even get him in for an immediate diagnosis.


Of the opinion that a distended abdomen is never good news, we thought time was of the essence. We put our heads together and decided that, even though our normal policy is not fund diagnostic procedures, Tyson’s case was unique and deserved our attention. Angela was able to get him to the vet for a diagnosis, and DIP picked up the tab for his visit. His complete blood panel shows some potential problems with his liver enzymes, and initial x-rays show some abdominal fluid and a possible mass, though his fecal was negative.

Tyson was sent home with antibiotics and special food; he has a recheck with the vet next week where follow-up x-rays will be done. An ultrasound is probably the next step that Angela will need to consider for Tyson; beyond that we can’t predict. She reports that he is already better, though, with the antibiotics and food, so we are keeping our collective Doberman fingers crossed for Tyson.  

 

If you would like to help with Tyson’s expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Tyson and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”



Zeus

Another very young Doberman.  At the tender age of only two years old Zeus has been diagnosed with idiopathic chylothorax. There is a lot of information out there about this condition, but the bottom line seems to be (to us regular folks, anyway) that its root causes are idiopathic (i.e., unknown). According to www.petmed.com, “Chylothorax is a condition that results from the accumulation oflymphaticfluid in the chest cavity where the heart and lungs reside (pleural cavity). The main culprit of this condition is chyle, a digestive fluid that is formed in the small intestine and conveyed by thethoracicduct to the veins. En route to the veins, chyle can leak into the chest cavity, accumulating there and causing excessive pressure on the chest and its organs.”

 

This Doberman’s family was on the ball and rushed him to the emergency clinic when they noticed he was suddenly gasping for air, unable to breathe normally. Since that time he has had several other episodes, each one resulting in a trip to the emergency clinic; at this writing Zeus is having his chest cavity drained of fluid by his regular vet about every five days. His veterinarian has recommended a surgery which is very expensive but will provide the best chance for Zeus to live a more normal life.

If you would like to help with Zeus’ expenses or any of our ongoing cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Lily and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

 

Abu

March 12, 2015

Three-year-old Abu’s human mom found him, one day in December, struggling to catch his breath. She rushed him to the hospital and heard the diagnosis that no Doberman owner ever, ever, ever wants to hear: “dilated cardio myopathy.” We really feel for Abu and for his human mom; we know what an uphill battle lies ahead of them. Abu is a typical DoberBoy, barely out of puppyhood, as you will see in his picture.

 

We want to help with his ongoing veterinary expenses and medications, in an effort to extend his life and improve its quality. We salute his human mom for not euthanizing him, and for making the monumental effort she is making to help him.

  

 

Dilated cardio myopathy is more prevalent in Dobermans than in other breeds, but strides are also being made in treatments like stem cell therapy, and there are some very dedicated veterinarians dedicating themselves to this research. We thank them all, and hope that prevention and cure of this devastating disease are within our reach.

If you would like to help with any of our cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Lily and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.

Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”

March 24, 2015

We told you about Abu earlier this month, and though the prognosis wasn’t good and we knew it – and Karina, Abu’s mom, knew it – we were hoping for better news than we got today. Karina let him go over the weekend. He was suffering, clearly, and when she took him to the vet the recommendation was euthanasia.

                                          

Karina did everything possible, including letting her beautiful Abu go when it was time. We appreciate her efforts on his behalf, and were happy to help her. Of course we wish we could have done more.

We wish Karina only beautiful memories of Abu.

From all of us at DIP.

Lily

March 11, 2015

Lily is eight years old and has been with her family her whole life. They love, love, love her. She sleeps in bed with them, under the covers – just as many of the Dobermans who belong to our supporters sleep. Most of us who sleep with our Dobermans wouldn’t trade it for anything; Lily’s folks are no different.

Lily is diabetic, and has been for a couple of years now. She gets an insulin injection twice a day, a routine her folks are very happy to maintain for her. Sadly, the diabetes has caused cataracts to develop in both eyes, which has impacted her ability to see. She is virtually blind.

                             

Her owners asked us for help, so we got busy looking at options for them. Surgery was a possibility, but after consulting with her vet we felt she might not be a perfect candidate for that. We got in touch with the people at “Muffin’s Halo,” and after talking with them decided that would be a nice compromise between subjecting her to surgery and being able to do nothing for her. The halo was developed by a pet owner for her own blind dog, Muffin.  She has adjusted quite well to the halo (see the photo of her wearing it), and it really does work to keep her from running into things.

                                                                                                                                 

We are happy to recommend this product, and the people who handled our purchase of it. Go here http://www.muffinshalo.com/ to see their products and success stories.
If you would like to help with any of our cases, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Be sure to check out photos of Lily and other cases we are currently evaluating on Facebook. We’ll post progress reports.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”


Sundance Archer

January 2, 2014

You can probably guess that when a Doberman has two names – like this little guy – somebody thinks he’s pretty special. That’s the case with Arianna, Sundance Archer’s mom. She loves him with all her heart, despite having him for only a couple of months. He was being surrendered to the local animal shelter, where Arianna intervened and adopted him. She had been looking for a Doberman, so this seemed like a wish granted.

Arianna has taken Sundance Archer to weekly obedience sessions, in addition to having his vaccines updated and having him neutered in November. In other words, she’s done everything you would expect a dedicated Doberman owner to do and then some, as she is absolutely committed to helping him become a well-adjusted Dober-gent.

 

Just before Christmas, Arianna noticed a shocking decline in Sundance Archer’s physical condition. He had been thin when she adopted him but had been making headway on gaining weight. She could tell he was in trouble, that this was an emergency, and took him immediately to her vet. From there, she was referred to a specialty clinic where Sundance Archer was diagnosed with a perforation in his small intestine. Yes, that’s as awful as it sounds. He was septic – suffering from blood poisoning, basically – because the perforation in his intestine was allowing food and bacteria to seep into his abdominal cavity. This puppy needed emergency surgery if he was going to survive, and even at that he was given a 75% chance of dying.


We’re happy to say that Sundance Archer survived the surgery and was released to go home several days sooner than anybody expected. He is making a remarkable recovery; Arianna refers to him as her “Christmas miracle puppy.” She’s altered her work schedule in order to accommodate caring for him in this critical post-operative timeframe, working as much as she can from home for now.


 

Jax

Sept 13, 2013
Jax is an irresistible Doberman puppy. Check out his pictures, and we think you’ll agree. His owners adopted him from a reputable Doberman rescue, and had a new baby of their own before long – you can see Jax and the baby in one of the photos.

 

Jax got into some difficulty when he ate something that blocked his intestines (this is more common than many folks realize until it happens to their dogs), and he had to have emergency surgery to remove the object – which turned out to be a piece of a corn cob. He is doing wonderfully at this time, and we have no reason to suspect he’ll have any residual effects from his brush with disaster.
Jax’s owners contacted us because they are struggling with the expense of the surgery; this was completely unexpected, as you can imagine, and virtually impossible to plan for. His owners had the option of returning Jax to the rescue they adopted him from, but they were adamant they wanted to keep him in their family, new baby and all. We appreciate their devotion to this cute puppy, and we support 100% their decision to keep him rather than relinquishing him back to the rescue.

 

We would like to contribute some money toward Jax’s surgery. If you would like to donate to help any of our cases, CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.


Daisy Mae

Sept 29, 2013

Daisy Mae has a condition known as blastomycosis. It’s a relatively rare, but potentially fatal fungal infection caused by the pathogen Blastomyces dermatidis. Daisy’s owner is a critical care nurse, which probably contributed to the quick diagnosis of this infection. Carissa, Daisy Mae’s owner, says that her nurse’s gut was screaming that something was terribly wrong, and fortunately her veterinarian listened to her. (And let’s just say, once again, we are so thankful to all the caring, intuitive vets out there who help us care for our Dobermans. Where would we all be without your guidance and support?) Daisy Mae has endured trips to the emergency room, ice packs to lower her fever, intravenous fluids, and several medications including prednisone and an anti-fungal medication, intended to halt the infection and allow her to heal. She has been through an awful lot, combating this infection.

 

She is a young dog – about four years old – who is loved and pampered by her owners. The treatments are ongoing at this time, but Daisy Mae is making good progress. If you look at her photos you’ll see what a typical Dober Princess she is, and you’ll get a good feel for how much she is loved. Her owners are volunteers for Doberman rescue in their area, and they provide foster care occasionally for dogs waiting to be adopted. All of us at Dobermans In A Pinsch have been heavily involved in Doberman rescue, so we know what a gift it is to foster dogs; we salute Daisy Mae and her owners for doing this!

They need a hand with these tremendously expensive treatments to give Daisy Mae a chance at recovering and living the long life she deserves. We want to help them accomplish this. If you would like to make a tax deductable donation for any of our cases, CLICK HERE. or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.


Simon

September 25, 2013

Two years ago, Simon was in a Doberman rescue, waiting for a person who would come and choose him. Simon was strong-willed, not considered an easy Doberman to adopt. The rescue had classified him as a dog that could go only to an individual or family experienced with Dobermans. Things were looking rather bleak for Simon when Ken came to the rescue looking for the right Doberman. That day things turned in Simon’s favor; Ken chose him and began the process of training and socializing this special Doberman. With Ken’s firm guidance, along with his love and attention, Simon became a cherished family member. We think Simon hit the jackpot.

Circumstances for Ken have changed recently, and he is dealing with some financial hardships. He’s been living with his mom and Simon in a hotel due to having lost his home. Ken contacted us for assistance because he, his mom, and Simon are moving from the hotel into a place of their own. Moving with a dog is always challenging, but it can be particularly so with a large dog like a Doberman. Though Ken could return Simon to the rescue, he would consider that only as a last resort. It’s heartbreaking for him to think of living without Simon, so Ken came to us to ask for some assistance with expenses so that he can avoid this possibility.

Ken is a disabled Navy veteran, a guy who served his country, cares for his elderly mom, and adopted a Doberman who needed an experienced, dedicated owner. We’d like very much to help them during this transition time so that Simon can stay with his family.

 

If you can help with a donation for Cherry Belle or any of our other cases, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”


Shelby

August 31, 2013 

We heard about Shelby from Sue, a friend of Shelby’s mom, Sharon. Sharon has become blind since adopting Shelby, and is now on disability. Shelby has easily moved into being Sharon’s assistance dog, alerting her to anything of concern happening outside, as well as inside. In addition to that, Shelby is her constant companion and guardian. Sharon counts on Shelby now more than ever.

We know how invaluable Dobermans are as assistance dogs, and when we heard that Shelby needed orthopedic surgery we decided to get involved. Shelby has two things: a torn cranial cruciate ligament that must be repaired, and an awesome vet who was touched by the relationship between Sharon and Shelby. It touched us, too, and we want to help Shelby.

  

Her bills will be substantial, though her vet is doing everything he can to keep the price down. Shelby needs her leg repaired as soon as possible. Sharon does not have the ability to pay for this surgery, but she wants with all her being to keep Shelby with her. Right now Shelby is on pain medication, but that can be only temporary because a torn ligament does not heal without veterinary intervention.

 

This wonderful Doberman came into Sharon’s life through rescue, and has become a vital part of it. We want to help keep them together by helping Shelby get the surgery she needs. If you can help us with a tax deductible donation, please CLICK HERE. You can donate there via PayPal or send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.



Cisco

August 22,2013


Here is a young Doberman – only a little over a year old – who had the incredible bad luck to be hit by a truck. His owner, Miguel, was at work at the time and when a visitor came to the front door Cisco ran out before anyone could catch him. He was in pretty bad shape at first, and his chances of survival were not considered very good. He sustained several broken bones in his back, severe lacerations on his legs, as well as fluid in his lungs as a result of the impact from the truck. This all happened just four days ago.

He may get to go home as early as next week, though his recovery will continue long after that. He will need to return to the clinic for continued evaluation of the extent of the neurological damage that he sustained. Right now he has a little trouble with his back feet, but as his vet says, “It’s only been four days. I’m very optimistic about his ability to live a long and happy life.”

 

The bills are mounting with the intensive care Cisco is receiving right now, and Miguel has maxed out his available financial resources. We would like to pay a portion of Cisco’s bill; your donations will help us do that. Please help us with a tax deductible donation by CLICKING HERE. You can donate there via PayPal or send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.

Riggs

July 9, 2013

Riggs is a five-year-old Doberman with aspergillosis. This is a condition we didn’t know much about, but the specialists who are treating him were kind enough to tell us that it’s a fungus confined mostly to the Ohio River Valley. It can manifest itself in several different ways, but in Riggs’ case it seems to be confined to his sinuses. The treatments he is getting require him to be anesthetized and then have his sinus cavities infused with medication that will kill the spores. More than one treatment is often required, and his family simply cannot afford the expense of multiple treatments, so DIP stepped up to help them with the cost of the treatments.

 

The three treatments he has had so far have made quite a difference in the symptoms, and his veterinarian is optimistic about his prognosis. His veterinarian wants him to have another one because those symptoms (sneezing and some nasal discharge) are not completely gone yet. We’ve authorized another treatment, which his mom is going to schedule for him this week, and we are sending all good wishes and positive energy to this big mushball, hoping he’ll be back to normal in no time.

His mom, Lisa, says he is a gentle, happy boy, one who loves to go for walks and be on the couch with his folks. Here are a couple of pictures of him doing just that.

If you can help fund cases like Riggs, CLICK HERE. You can make a tax deductible donation there via PayPal. You can also send a check to Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc. PO Box 8232, Newport Beach CA 92658.